Saint Cyprian’s in Autumn

After days of heavy rains and dark, grey skies, for a few hours the sun started to peek out from behind the clouds, illuminating the autumn colours on the trees. Dad and I paused by Saint Cyprian’s in Lenzie – framed by the trees and their changing colours, with the autumnal light on the old stone of the 1873 church it was a rather beautiful scene.

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The spire on Saint Cyprian’s boasts some handsome gargoyles at the top (if you are wondering about the difference, while gargoyles and grotesques are both sculpted forms of monsters, odd beasts or humans and have symbolic meaning, the grotesques are non-functional, purely decorative, while gargoyles contain water spouts for drainage, usually from the mouth).

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My Photo Year, 2020

Looking back through my ever-expanding Flickr uploads (now approaching 22, 000 photos), as usual around this time of year I am picking out some of my favourite photos I snapped this year. Of course I didn’t realise that I would spend so many long, long months in Lockdown, walking alone through almost empty streets of my city. I’ve always enjoyed trying to document life and events through the lens, but in this year of Covid and enforced isolation the camera became part of my coping mechanism for the tedious days after days of Lockdown and Furlough, allowed out the house just once a day, everywhere closed, so few people to see and when you did you all tried to keep your distance (and the even longer months of not being able to see family and friends).

Of course I still documented it – from empty streets in Edinburgh’s Old Town (so disturbing – in a city suffering an overload of tourism, suddenly we were deserted, the Castle Esplanade, Grassmarket, Royal Mile on a sunny Easter holiday weekend, barely a soul to be seen), to exhausted cycle couriers (often the main part of the now limited road traffic during the Lockdown months) to masked and socially distancing people. It was all upsetting, disturbing, depressing, stressful, frightening, and the fact we were all so isolated made it harder to deal with, so again the photography helped me process it.

Paisley Streetart 02
Early on in the year, when things were still seemingly normal – we were reading about this dangerous new virus outbreak in China and Asia, but it all seemed so far away at the time – my colleagues and I were setting up a portable bookshop for the first ever Paisley Book Festival, shuttling back and forth to man the stalls, get books signed at author events etc, enjoying ourselves and supporting a new literary event into the bargain. Naturally I also snapped a few pics wandering around Paisley between events, including some photos of the very excellent street murals I noticed.
Paisley Streetart 01
Central Station 01
A bright, winter’s day in February in Glasgow’s Central Station, the famous station clock hanging from the roof above. In the days before mobile phones many would arrange to meet friends and loved ones below the clock when heading into town. Quick snap while heading on to Paisley for the new book festival
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The wonderful Jackie Kay at the first Paisley Book Festival.
Paisley Book Festival - Chris McQueer and Alan Bissett 01
Chris McQueer (left), talking to Alan Bissett at the first Paisley Book Festival
Busy Buchanan Street 02
Late February, heading towards Central Station in Glasgow – look how busy Buchanan Street is even on a midweek day in winter. Just weeks later this would be deserted, like streets in almost every other city in Europe
Helen Fields & Mark Douglas-Home Crime Cocktail 01
Still in February and we had a great crime fiction evening with Helen Fields and Mark Douglas-Home at our bookshop. Again we didn’t know then this would be the last in-person event we’d do this whole year (thankfully we have had a programme of online author events though, working with two other Indy bookshops under the We Three Indies banner)
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At the Capital SciFi Con in February, chatting to Tanya Roberts. Busy con, much fun catching up with chums, chatting to some authors and artists I know, taking pics. Again with no clue that this would be the last con we could attend for the whole of 2020 at that point….
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Rain-washed Cinema
Rain-washed entrance to the Cameo Cinema on a winter’s night. A few weeks after snapping this, the cinemas and theatres were all closed.
Beach Life 012
Early March, and although the international news stories on the advance of Covid infections are worrying, it still seems distant. An early spring day full of sunlight at Portobello sees people enjoying the beach and the coast, but the pandemic is closer than we realised.
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Seaside Selfie By The Sea Shore
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Event Horizon March 2020 016
Mid-March – the international situation is increasingly grave, Covid is advancing across Europe, Italy in particular is in a terrible situation. We can all look at the map of the disease’s advance and know that it’s coming out way. We’re enjoying our Event Horizon evening of literary science fiction readings and music, organised by the Shoreline of Infinity journal. We’re all enjoying it, but there is an undercurrent of unease, we all know as we leave that this would probably be the last live event we would all enjoy together for a while. Again, we had no idea just how long, at this point we thought we may soon be locked down for a couple of months, we had no idea entire festivals and the year of shows and events would be swallowed in this pandemic year.
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Event Horizon March 2020 011
Empty Streets 04
March 21st, a Saturday night. Lothian Road, which I’d normally avoid on a Saturday evening as it is heaving with drunks coming out of the many pubs and restaurants. Not this evening. The Lockdown was just days from being announced, but already the pubs and restaurants had closed. I saw only two people as I headed home from a visit to a friend, which I knew was probably the last time I would get to visit them for a long time. I had no idea then just how long, of course… It was eerie to see such a bustling part of the city devoid of life on a weekend night. It was a taste of what was to come.
Empty Streets 02
Thank You NHS
Late March, 2020. We were now in Lockdown, most shops and businesses closed, workers furloughed. I walked daily, the only time I could be out the house. As I walked down an unbearably quiet Princes Street on a misty afternoon, I noticed every single digital billboard on the bus shelters had been changed to read “thank you, NHS” as a show of support and gratitude for frontline medical staff.
Wee Songbird Singing to the City
Nature was another lifeline during the Lockdown months of isolation – with almost no car traffic, few aircraft flying overhead, hardly any trains, little in the way of people in the city centre, the sounds of the wildlife was heard so much more clearly, most especially the singing of birds. It was joyous. And we needed it.
Hello, Birdy 02
Swan Family 017
Another annual wonder of the natural world, that this year during Lockdown became so much more special and needed – watching our resident breeding pair of mute swans with their new brood of cygnets, following them through weeks and months along the Union Canal from tiny fluffballs to adult-sized adolescents taking wing to start their own lives somewhere else (as I write there is still a single cygnet that has remained with Mama and Papa Swan for the moment)
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Moorhen and Chick 03
Moorhen and its baby chick on the Union Canal
Duck Life 07
Heron on the Water of Leith 03
Berry Bird
Springtime in Scotland 05
Still deep in Lockdown with no end in sight, but the spring came, the natural world moved on as it always did, regardless of the woes in the human world, and the cherry blossoms this year were such a blessing, picking up our battered spirits.
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The “tree tunnel” of cherry blossoms blooming in the Meadows, an annual miracle that we needed this year more than ever. As I was lining these shots up a pair of young women had clearly noticed me engrossed in my camera and were posing in the frame! Made me smile
A Tunnel of Cherry Blossoms 01
Autumn on the Water of Leith 05
As with the blossoms of spring, the colours of autumn were even more appreciated this year – the natural world was a huge comfort and morale booster.
All Shows Are Cancelled
Cinemas, theatres and concert venues all closed. This row of illuminated billboard stands on Lothian Road normally proclaim the shows and acts coming up at the nearby Usher Hall, Royal Lyceum Theatre and Traverse Theatre. Not this spring. No shows, no venues, locked doors, empty streets. As summer arrived even the world-famous Edinburgh festivals were all restricted to a few online only events. No schmoozing in the Author’s Yurt at the Edinburgh International Book Festival for me in 2020, for the first time in many years, although thankfully I did still get to chair – albeit via Zom – at our second Cymera SF literary festival, and we kept out book group going by Zoom and chat, another lifeline.
Circus Lane at Dusk 04
Beautiful Circus Lane at dusk, one of the loveliest spots in the historic New Town
Lucky Liquor
Another shot from a night walk – couldn’t resist the glowing neon sign on this bar.
It Ain't Easy
The mask, the tired expression and trudge with the groceries, from the once-a-day permitted trip to the stores. A regular sight in Lockdown, think we all felt like this a lot of the time
Lockdown Grassmarket 03
Spring and the pubs and restaurants in the Grassmarket should be bustling with tourists on short breaks. Not this year. All closed, many boarded up for safe measure. Boarded over windows, closed bars, empty Old Town streets. I kept thinking I could hear the music from 28 Days Later in my head as I walked alone through it.
The Distance Between Us Keeps Us Safe
The new normal: friends doing socially distanced chat in the grounds of the Gallery of Modern Art
We Are Observing Social Distance
More safely distanced chatting in Princes Street Gardens. As time went on during Lockdown and spring arrived this was about the only way we could see friends and family, in an open space, distanced. Handshakes, hugs, all off the menu.
Light Traffic 02
Walking the city during Lockdown – there was so little traffic even in the middle of the city in the middle of the day I could stand in the centre of the normally busy junction of the Mound and Princes Street quite safely to take this shot.
How We Shop Now 03
This rapidly became the new normal – boy, did we get sick of that phrase quickly. Hardware store in Morningside, allowed to remain open during Lockdown but no customers in the shop. Instead now staff masked and behind a plastic safety screen talk at the door to customers who wait in the street, socially distanced in a queue for their turn to ask for what they need.
Sorry, We're Closed 02
“Sorry, we are closed” – what we thought would be a few weeks or perhaps a couple of months of Lockdown and Furlough was going on. And on. And on….
Skater Life 04
The skaters who usually hang around Bristo Square were still active even during Lockdown – a sport and hobby the could share with their chums while all being outside and safely distanced.
Skater Gal
Lockdown Juggling Practise 06
Some used the enforced downtime of Furlough to learn new skills, like practising their juggling skills on Bruntsfield Links
Operatic 02
Spring had arrived, most places were still closed but there were more people out walking as the weather got nicer and warmer. Walking in the Meadows I heard someone singing an aria and found this woman on Middle Meadow Walk. With no street performers and no music venues for months, this was the first time I had heard someone performing since Lockdown started. I sat under a tree with a newly leafy canopy of spring greenery, in th spring sunlight, as her voice soared upwards into the branches. It was so unexpected and so beautiful I was overwhelmed and cried. It reminded me of the scene in The Shawshank Redemption where the central character plays an opera disc over the prison tannoy, and for a moment all the inmates are transported. Little moments like this were life rafts in the despairing sea of isolation that was Lockdown.
Hello, There
Masks quickly became part of our new everyday life….
Masked in the Mist
Trio 05
Receipt
Three Women, Masked 02
Timmy Two Phones
God I miss my local pubs – this is the Diggers in Gorgie, one of my regular watering holes. Sure you can buy booze in the supermarket and drink at home, but it is the social aspect of the pub, especally your regular local haunts, that you miss.
A Hand to Hold is a Wonderful Thing 01
It wasn’t all loneliness and isolation – 2020 was no doubt a little easier to take if you had a hand to hold. Many of us didn’t though…
We All Need a Hug Sometimes
Elegant Lady in a Hat
Elegant lady in summer dress and hat, almost seemed like a normal scene in this abnormal year….
Time For a Quick Break 01
Water Music
Summer weather arrived, more people took advantage of being outdoors but safely distanced, like this chap sitting in the sun by the old Leamington Lift Bridge, playing his guitar
Summertime, and the Living is Easy 02
Books Are Back
July and our lovely wee bookshop could re-open (with masks, visors and safety screens and regular handwipes, but at least we were open and it felt so nice)
Squirrel and Tree 03
Met this bushy tailed wee chap as I was walking through the Meadows
Akva Returns 01
The pubs re-opened in the summer, with social distancing, tracking and other safety protocols. It was a peculiar experience to go back – I had missed them but now felt wary of being in one, so I only went a couple of times, usually to outdoor beer gardens, only able to meet one friend at a time, distanced and only for a certain time slot. Now as the year end the pubs have all been closed once more for weeks…
A Strange Graduation Time 02
Another unreal aspect to this strange year in our world – I was walking in the summer through Bristo Square, and saw several Asian ladies taking photos of each other in their academic robes. Graduation photos to take home, in a year where the graduates never got to have a graduation ceremony. My friends and I had our graduation in this spot many years ago and I felt terribly sorry that so many this year would miss out on that event, what for most will be a once in a lifetime occurence, maybe last time all their college friends are together before going their own ways to start their new lives.
Vinyl Therapy 01
The pop up music stall re-appeared in the late summer and early autumn on Middle Meadow Walk. The first time in over half a year I had been able to indulge in the simple pleasure of browsing for some new vinyl records. What little pleasures we used to take for granted before Covid.
It's So Tiring 02
Exhausted cycle courier during Lockdown, grabbing a short break by the National Museum of Scotland
Window Shopping on a Misty Night
Getting late in the year and the autumnal and winter haars settled over Edinburgh. I love how this city looks in the mist, especially at night. This was Bruntsfield Place, near Holy Corner, as I was leaving our bookshop one night, I took a freehand night shot, as I had no tripod with me, so it is a bit rough, but I liked how it came out.
Fountain and Spires at Night 03
Saint Cuthbert’s church and the Ross Fountain, from a nocturnal stroll through the town
Twilight Fortress 02
Edinburgh Castle at night, viewed from the gathering darkness below in Princes Street Gardens
Hot Food 02
The small open-air cafe in Princes Street Gardens at dusk
Steamed Up
Steamed up windows at night in the Mayfly cafe, Bruntsfield
Evening at Cafe Grande 02
Looking through the window of Cafe Grande after dark, Bruntsfield Place.
Misty Evening in Bruntsfield 02

 

Winter Hills 05
Winter arrives – snow on the great, volcanic bulk of the Campsie Hills over the Christmas holidays (such as they were this year)

Glasgow School of Art

Devastating news from my birth city of Glasgow today, her gorgeous gem, her world famous, Mackintosh-designed School of Art has suffered a terrible blaze, even worse happening while it was still undergoing restoration from a previous, smaller fire that damaged this artistic and cultural and historic prize. This fire is far worse, some architects are already thinking it may be beyond repair.

This is a dreadful event; this isn’t just the destruction of a cultural and historic site, Mackintosh’s famous design is live history, it is woven into the pulsing, live heartbeat of the vibrant artistic, creative soul Glasgow nurtures across decades, across social and class and ethnic divides. It’s heartbreaking to see the devout restoration work go up in flames after the last disaster, it seems unbelievable it could happen a second time, let alone while many struggled to repair and restore the damage of the last fire.

My beloved Caledonia has, for centuries, punched above her weight: a small kingdom of mountains surrounded by the cold northern seas we have generated philosophers, artists, writers, scientists, doctors and engineers far beyond the sum of our small population, our Scottish Enlightenment has been a beacon of civilisation, and the Glasgow School of Art has been a part of that, fostering, nurturing talent from all walks of life in that egalitarian way Glasgow does (growing up in Glasgow one lesson I learned was that it considered that art and culture was for all its citizens, not just the prosperous chattering classes, our museums and galleries served all, encouraged all).

Glasgow School of Art, designed by one of the world-famous Scottish artists and architects, Charles Rennie Mackintosh, has produced a seemingly endless stream of cultural and artistic greats across the century and half, from Doctor Who’s Peter Capaldi to poet and dramatist Liz Lochhead, the great John Byrne, Scottish comics god Frank Quietely, and Norman McLaren. Glasgow’s famously egalitarian approach to both science and the arts has helped foster and produce world-class creative talent, nurtured in an environment designed by a fellow artist and architect.

This is heartbreaking, it feels like someone has pierced the heart of my vibrant, beating heart city that suffered so much from the decline of its great industries and rebirthed itself partly through these same arts and cultures. This is beyond damage to our shared culture and historic and artistic heritage, it’s a blow to the heart of a vibrant, living artistic culture that, from a small land on the far northern edge of the world has nurtured and encouraged creative genius in so many walks of life: world-wide reputation artists, Nobel winning writers, engineers, scientists and more.

It’s a horrible wound to our nation’s remarkable cultural heritage. Glasgow has suffered worse. Scotland has suffered worse. New creators will arise from the burnt ashes like a magnificent Phoenix and spread their fiery wings across our skies to light a way to the future while illuminating the shadows of the past. This is heartbreaking, devastating news, this blaze, this destruction. But Glasgow School of art is about creation, not destruction. Like its home city which survived the loss of its mighty industries which made it, which remade itself afterwards, it will too remake itself and it will be a beacon once more to artists we don’t even know yet but will one day nod proudly at when they are named in great international awards and say, aye, they trained at Glasgow School of Art. I’m horrified at the lost of so much of of our gorgeous, built, designed, crafted heritage.

But that’s not the real heart of Glasgow, nor her School of Art, it’s heart is the urge, the need to create, express ourselves. That cannot be restrained by fire and demolition. Wood burns, even stone fails eventually, fire claims and burns, but the desire, the urge, the need to create is never quenched. Writers will write, painters will paint, sculptors will sculpt, film-makers will craft their imagery. Fire does not, will not stop us. It is not just stone and wood and carvings and buildings. As long as we dream, and think and feel and create, the School of Art exists. Creativity exists. Glasgow breathes and her heart beats and continues.

Cloisters

I’ve been meaning to take some photos around the gorgeous old cloisters that divide the two main quadrangles in Glasgow University for ages, and as I was visiting nearby Kelvingrove then walking past the Uni with chums on the way to Ashton Lane (a regular haunt from the old days, lovely wee cobbled back street with indy cinema, bars, restaurants and cafes), we paused at the uni so I could get a few shots.

Cloisters 04

Cloisters 01

Glasgow University 04

This petrol station is no more, it has ceased to be…

Petrol stations seem to be a vanishing species these days around UK towns, I’ve noticed several go just in the last couple of years near where I live, unable to compete with the large petrol stations attached to so many supermarket chain stores these days.

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This one is on the Cumbernauld Road by the dual carriageway towards Glasgow, just as you come off to Chryston and Muirhead. I noticed it a few months ago when I was visiting dad and we passed by, this particular day I remembered it was there in time to get dad to pull over so I could get some shots.

this petrol station is no more, it has ceased to be 02

Usually when petrol stations close down the pumps and the underground tanks are removed pretty quickly – they have to go and the site needs to be cleaned up before the rest of the demolition then any new structure taking its place. So while it is not uncommon to see a closed former filling station, they are rarely more than weed-choked concrete forecourts and a boarded up building. This one, I noticed though, still had its petrol pumps, which is unusual for those to be left in place for any length of time, so I wanted to get a few photos while they were still there, rusting away, the filling hoses and nozzle lying like contented snakes soaking up the sun. The light was strong that day so perfect for bagging a few shots of urban-commercial dereliction before it gets demolished.

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Couldn’t resist a perspective shot – the three pumps in the front all lined up, and if you click the pic to go to the original on my Flickr and check the larger size you will see there is actually a fourth pump at the back of the station, lined up with these:

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The once bright, jolly blue paint is peeling off, the metal oxidising

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Someone had wrenched open the inspection panel on the front of one pump, as if to “disembowel” it, exposing the mechanics within, the wiring, hoses and pumps, with even the serial numbers and inspection stickers still all clearly visible and legible:

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View from the back of the abandoned Crowood Filling Station

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The rusting petrol pumps seemed to be like commercial tombstones marking a form of business that just couldn’t evolve to keep going in the cruel and merciless, ever-changing marketplace

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Even the metal sign listing different tyre pressures for various models of car was decaying, rust now obscuring almost all of the information, only the Michelin logo and the smiling face of Bibendum still clearly visible on this abandoned place:

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No, I don’t really know why, but I just felt quite compelling to document this site with a few photos – as I said, rare to see one closed for any length of time and still having all the pumps etc still in place, and of course it’s only a matter of time before it will be gone, so was good to grab a bright day to take a few photos before it vanishes some day.

Happy 110th birthday, Kelvingrove

Kelvingrove 1

Today marks the 110th anniversary of a true Scottish institution opening its doors to the public: on May 2nd, 1901 the Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum first admitted the people of Glasgow and Scotland to enter within this temple of delights. Generations of Scots have grown up with the Kelvingrove, walking through the pleasures of nearby Kelvingrove park, or coming down from the Gothic spires of nearby Glasgow University and the Bohemian pleasures of studenty Byres Road, to the banks of the Kelvin and this palace of wonders and knowledge and art. Those generations include me: like many children growing up in Glasgow the Kelvingrove was a regular pleasure, my parents taking me in there. It was my childhood idea of what a great museum should be – knights in shining armour, Egyptian mummies, mighty dinosaur skeletons! My, what treasures to delight a wee boy, to spark his imagination and generate a lifelong love of history and learning.

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Kelvingrove 4

And the adult me adores it still – when my friend (who also grew up visiting the Kelvingrove) and I went through after the museum re-opened after an extensive refurbishment we both still loved it. A real Supermarine Spitfire hanging from the cieling in one gallery right above a giraffe! An Egyptian sarcophogus. Exquisitely made medieval armour – among the many collections the museum enjoys an international reputation for is its arms and armour, it boasts one of the finest collections anywhere. And then those light filled upper galleries full of artworks, from the Scottish Colourists and the Glasgow Boys to an international panoply of artists of the ages. It is the first place I saw Salvador Dali’s powerful Christ on the Cross, an amazing work even to those of us who have no truck with religion. And it is still free – free to all the citizens of Glasgow and Scotland and our visitors, a people’s palace, open to and run for the people of its city and country, long may it continue.

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rrroaaarrrrr!!!

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Dad in the City Art Centre

Out and about for Glasgow’s Doors Open Day at the weekend with dad, who decided to sit down and have a breather while I wandered up the stairs in the City Art Centre on Sauchiehall Street, which has a lovely ‘inside-outside’ feel to its courtyard, with the external walls of old buildings making the atrium which is covered but flooded with natural light, even on overcast days. I went up the open stairs to take a few pics and leaning over the rail to look down spotted dad, who looked up towards me just as I was taking a pic; quite pleased with this one.

Dad in City Art Centre

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