Row, row, row your boat

Arriving early for work I had a few minutes to go grab a coffee and have a walk along the Promenade at Portobello. Gorgeous autumn morning, cool but beautiful autumnal light on the Firth of Forth, when I spotted the sailing and rowing club folks out in the lovely old skiff Jenny Skylark, having an early morning row, so I snapped off a few shots before I had to head into work:

The Jenny Skylark on a Morning Row 01

The Jenny Skylark on a Morning Row 02

The Jenny Skylark on a Morning Row 03

The Jenny Skylark on a Morning Row 04

A vry different scene to a month or so back when the haar had settled on the Forth – I saw the rowers out in the skiff, but only dimly, moving through the sea mist just off the shore at Porty, and managed to get these pics, very different weather from the other pics!

Rowing in the Haar 02

Rowing in the Haar 01

Picturing the Year

As another year ends time to have a look back through my now enormous Flickr photo stream (now well north of 17, 000 pictures) and pick out some of the favourite shots I managed to take during 2018:

Misty evening in Edinburgh – handheld shot walking home one night, amazed it came out:

Misty Evening 06

This poor chap was a rough sleeper, he had set up a small camp bed in Greyfriars kirkyard, his belongings in bags under a nearby tombstone, just a few feet away from the groups of passing tourists exploring the historic church and graveyard:

sleeping among the dead 01

Autumn but still some bursts of bright natural colours – this close-up was snapped in September in Greyfriars kirkyard, a bloom among the tombstones…

last colours of summer blooms among the tombstones

Another macro shot, playing with the close up facility on the camera, these autumnal berries and leaves came out quite nicely, I thought:

Autumn in the Colzium 09

Taken the same day in the Colzium at Kilsyth, these gorgeously coloured autumn leaves:

Autumn in the Colzium 03

Lady enjoying a burst of warm sunshine on an autumn day:

Calton Hill on an autumn day 06

The Church of Scotland Assembly Building on the Mound, at Blue Hour:

Church of Scotland Assembly Building, autumn evening 01

National Gallery of Scotland at dusk:

The Mound, autumn evening 05

Union Canal at Blue Hour:

Union Canal, autumn evening 01

The recently refurbished McEwan Hall at night:

Bristo Square at night 04

The brightly painted Victoria Street on a damp evening:

Victoria Street on a wet winter night 01

The photographer photographed:

The Photographer

Lovely young Fringe performer kindly posing for me on the Royal Mile during the festival:

Fringe on the Mile 2018 0121

Really pleased with how this came out for a quick street portrait, taken of a Fringe performer on the Royal Mile. It went onto Flickr’s Explore page, so the views for it went crazy, several thousand views in just a few hours:

Fringe on the Mile 2018 036

My chum Darryl Cunningham paid a return visit to the Edinburgh International Book Festival:

Edinburgh International Book Festival 2018 - Darryl Cunningham 02

Relaxing in Charlotte Square during the Book Festival:

Edinburgh International Book Festival 2018 - Charlotte Square 02

Selfies on the Mile:

Sunny Smiling Selfie Stick Shot

One of the young animators at the McLaren Animation awards during the Edinburgh International Film Festival:

Edinburgh International Film Festival 2018 - McLaren Animation 015

Mike Zahs (with the beard) talking after the film festival screening of Saving Brinton, which is one of my favourite movies of the year:

Edinburgh International Film Festival 2018 - Saving Brinton 02

Russell Jones reading some of his poetry at the regular Event Horizon evening held most months by the Shoreline of Infinity journal in Edinburgh:

Event Horizon June 2018 018

Some shots from the Processions parade which marked a century since parliament gave (some) women the vote. I took a bunch of photos that day, lovely atmosphere, but these two were my favourites, came out quite well for improvised street portraits taken as they parade walked by:

Processions Edinburgh 2018 051

Processions Edinburgh 2018 019

Found a nest of fluffy wonders: I’d seen a couple of swans with their new baby cygnets on the Union Canal, then a few days later found their nest among reeds by the canal side, the babies sleeping inside while the parent swans kept a watchful eye nearby. The little wonders you can find just walking home from work…

Nest of wonderfulness 03

On a warm spring day, down by Musselburgh harbour, these two little scamps had climbed along the wall – they were pretty high up, and I think their parents would have a fit when they noticed how high they had gone!

Wall scaling monkeys

Same hot spring day, some kids enjoying themselves in the sea just off Portobello Beach, caught the moment just as one jumped from his boat:

fun on the water 012

Woman enjoying the spring weather, changing the music on her phone as she sits in the outdoor cafe in Princes Street Gardens, the sun dappled by the trees creating a nice mix of light and shade that drew me to frame it like this:

changing her tunes

Spring blossoms:

spring petals 02

Enjoying some fine spring weather by the floating cafe on the Union Canal, climbed up on the nearby old Leamington Lift Bridge to get this overhead angle:

cafe on the canal 02

Avengers Assemble!! Cosplayers at the comic con at Easter, these guys were friends of my chum, they had been out earlier in their costumes having their photos taken in some of the Edinburgh locations used in the Avengers: Infinity War movie:

Edinburgh Comic Con 2018 036

Family of cosplayers at the comic con!

Edinburgh Comic Con 2018 014

2000 AD veteran artist Colin MacNeil with Indy comics publisher and creator Colin Mathieson at the Edinburgh comic con:

Edinburgh Comic Con 2018 05

Winter’s night in Saint Andrew Square:

Saint Andrew Square, winter night 04

coffee after dark 01

Crossing North Bridge on an icy, snowy, windy winter’s day:

winter's night 01

Browsing for vinyl at the music stall in the street market:

street market, spring day 06

We were hit by seriously heavy snow storms in March, for only the second time in the decades I’ve lived here the buses stopped running even in the city centre. I ventured out to take a few photos, this was a nearby cemetery – my coat was white by this point from the heavy snowflakes being blown by strong wind, so I snapped a couple of pics then retreated home to the fireside!

Boneyard in the snow 07

More snow, this time on the Royal Mile:

Snowy Edinburgh 08

This was part of the Lumen light art installations, several different pieces that came on between dusk and dawn during the winter nights, brightening up the darkness. This was my favourite of the installation, the strings of light hanging down as ambient music played, you walked through them and let the lights sway around you, it was delightful and magical on a dark, winter’s night:

Edinburgh Lumen 03

This year was the Muriel Spark centenary, and it started with these projections onto the National Library of Scotland:

Muriel Spark Centenary 04

Princess Leia cosplayer and Wonder Woman at the Capital Sci-Fi Con:

Capital Sci-Fi Con 2018 022

Capital Sci-Fi Con 2018 018

Blue Hour on the Royal Mile back in January, sun set but this last smidgen of blue in the western sky, my favourite time of day:

Royal Mile at Blue Hour, winter's night 01

View over Edinburgh from North Bridge on Burns Night:

Edinburgh on Burns Night

The low winter sun bathing the lighthouse on the mighty Bass Rock last January:

Bass Rock at the end of a winter's day 02

Each January the National Gallery of Scotland shows their Turner collection (a gift to the nation years ago on the condition they be shown in winter when the light suits them best), I try to go along each year to see them again. As I came out the early winter night had fallen and the Mound by the galleries was icy:

The Mound on a wintry evening

New Year’s Resurrection – this short story by acclaimed Scots writer Val McDermid was projected onto buildings like the Signet Library at the very start of the year:

New Year's Resurrection 01

Tombstone shadows

Walking through historic Greyfriars kirkyard recently, the winter sun now very, very low in the sky. Clear but freezing day, low angle of sun creating a lovely, soft, golden light quality and casting long, long shadows, such as here where it stretched long shadows from the old tombstones out across the kirkyard.

low sun and long shadows in the old boneyard

Normally it’s not good practise to point the camera lens towards the sun, but I needed an angle looking in that direction to get these shadow strips into frame as I wanted, so I simply moved around a little until from my perspective the sun was blocked by a tree trunk just enough that I could get the shot without flaring out the image. Some days you get lucky…

Hazy sunset

hazy spring sunset 01

Crossing North Bridge recently, very hazy day – haar in the morning had almost hidden the summit of Arthur’s Seat and turned the Castle into a faint pencil on tracing paper outline, but the spring sunshine came out and burned it away. Then as dusk fell the mist returned off the Forth and along with some wispy clouds gave us this incredible diffused sunset turning the sky orange, pink, purple and copper, silhouetting the Castle, the spires and old buildings of Edinburgh. Only lasted a few precious moments, utterly ephemeral and yet so beautiful, stopped me and many others in our tracks, just pausing the commute home from work to drink in this magical scene. Things like this can just happen in this remarkable city, it’s another reason why I love living here.

hazy spring sunset 02

A little piece of family history

My dad recently handed me over some very old family photographs, and in the very old leather wallet they were in was my grandfather’s pass for the Saint Andrew’s Ambulance Corps, Kirkintilloch branch (he was a very fine first aider, also looked after the fitness of the local football team and worked the ambulances during the second world war):

papa's St Andrew's Ambulance Corps pass 01

When you look at the interior you can see that he signed it on the 8th of April 1933:

papa's St Andrew's Ambulance Corps pass 02

And here he is even earlier than that date, he’s the one standing here, with waistcoat and pocket watch on a chain, both things I am rather fond of myself; I’d like to think it got that from him:

old print 01

The Flashing Blade

Admiring some beautiful, historic swords in the National Museum of Scotland, brings out the Flashing Blade in me, urge to swashbuckle rises… In truth that urge to swashbuckle is never far from the surface, which is probably one of the reason I fenced throughout school and then years later at college. Although not with these. Gorgeous basket-handled Scottish swords, including a very unusual curved blade. Beautiful work, although I prefer a sword with a less elaborate guard so it leaves the fingers and wrist more free to make light, quick movements, which is a better method of defence for the hand than a large guard, at least that’s how I was trained.

swords in National Museum of Scotland 07

swords in National Museum of Scotland 04

swords in National Museum of Scotland 03

An enormous Claymore – Claymore from this period are generally massive weapons, but I think this one was perhaps ceremonial

swords in National Museum of Scotland 01

Shadows cast by the Claymore:

swords in National Museum of Scotland 02

Looking across Edinburgh

I’ve uploaded a few more photos shot from the roof terrace garden on top of the National Museum of Scotland (see previous post); this one is Arthur’s Seat taken from the roof, with the shadows of clouds passing across the face of Salisbury Crags (best viewed in the large size on the Flickr page):

Arthur's Seat from National Museum of Scotland roof

The room just off the terrace where the lift is has large windows looking out towards Bristo Square and Edinburgh University, with the rotunda of McEwan Hall on the lower left (where my graduation ceremony took place a lifetime ago):

looking through the square window

This leads to the lift room but with the strong sun casting such lovely, clear shadows on the decking I had to take this:

National Museum of Scotland roof terrace 03

I also edited a few video segments into a 360 degree panoramic view of the city from this rather wonderful vantage point:

The roofs of Edinburgh

Recently I did something I hadn’t done before – in fact something I didn’t even know you could do: go onto the roof of the National Museum of Scotland on Chambers Street. I’ve been in many times but I had no idea there is a large roof terrace (with native plant garden) that you are free to visit too. I’ve wandered around the museum many times but the signs to the roof aren’t too obvious and most folks in Edinburgh I mentioned it too didn’t realise you could go up there either. Lovely spot offering pretty much 360 degree views over the roofs of the Old Town towards the Mile, over historic Greyfriars Kirk, nearby Edinburgh University, the Pentland Hills beyond the city, Arthur’s Seat, the huge extinct volcano which rears out of the royal park right in the middle of Edinburgh, and, of course, the Castle. Again I find myself wishing I could afford to upgrade to the camera I have my eye on which has much more zoom power, but even so it was still a great and quiet spot to stand and take in the view and shoot a few pics:

Greyfriar's and Castle from Museum roof

Saint Giles from Museum roof 02

Edinburgh Castle from National Museum roof 01

Put that book down and pay attention to me

Tidying up some files on my external hard drive and found some photos I hadn’t gotten around to uploading, including some of my gorgeous wee Dizzy who sadly I don’t get to see these days, which is very upsetting. Reading a book outside while she plays in the garden, but obviously she does not approve of the book as it takes my attention away from her, which is not acceptable to any kitty cat and especially not to Queen Dizzy:

I am bored of reading, entertain me

Having interposed between me and my book she now decides since I was foolish enough to move, she will just have my seat:

actually I'll just take your seat 02

Ohhh, what’s that over there? I am intrigued and considering investigating, but am loathe to give up the still-warm seat you so foolishly left unguarded:

what's over there too?

Spring time in Scotland

It’s, Scotland, it’s Easter, it’s spring time… So, plenty of snow then… Walking in the Pentlands today, snow left from the dreadful weather earlier this week which dumped snow over a lot of Scotland and storms that have made a mess of a lot of bits of the coastline. Some of it has melted away but in the Pentlands on the edge of Edinburgh it’s still lying there, from light dusting on some spots to seriously deep snow in other spots, coming up our shins almost to our knees.

snowy Pentlands 01

Walking up the hill the skyline gave a great effect, making it look like the clouds were rising up from below the horizon:

snowy Pentlands 07

snowy Pentlands 011

Walking through snow is tiring, time for a breather; this also means time for Bruce the dog to scrounge a biccie from his master:

Gordon and Bruce on snowy Pentlands 02

You can see Edinburgh spread out in the background here (click for the larger version on Flickr):

snowy Pentlands 012

Ghosts in the Hollow

Photographer Jim LoScalzo toured lost ghost towns in the Appalachians, once thriving mining towns which became deserted when those mines closed down, leaving the decaying, abandoned structures as ghosts of the past, crumbling monuments to the everyday life of the many men who toiled beneath the ground and their families who they toiled so hard for (and often lost their lives for, deep below, away from the light of the sun and the caress of the wind). Link from Selectism, via Jonathan Carroll.

Ghosts in the Hollow from Jim Lo Scalzo on Vimeo.

Reminded me a little of a day wandering around Prestongrange mining and industrial museum, early in spring, not another soul around, just me and rusting rail tracks, the long-disused winding wheel and old machinery. Not quite the same as his piece with the abandoned homes but still that feeling of ghosts of people, of a whole way of life gone forever, although at least here people can still come and explore that part of their industrial heritage.
Prestongrange mining museum 3

I was also struck by another of his works, this time a more modern yet no less haunted ghost town, empty areas of New Orleans, street lights still working but few people returned or some neighbourhoods even devoid of those who once lived there...

Twilight in New Orleans from Jim Lo Scalzo on Vimeo.