A home afloat

Dusk, walking home along the old Union Canal near where the huge Scottish & Newcastle Brewery used to dominate the area (now all gone, the large brownfield site being redeveloped, just as the canal has been already). As well as new wharfs and new buildings at the end of the canal and holiday barges (and even a floating restaurant barge) there are also folks living year round on barges, using them as house-boats, right in the centre of the city – how cosy do they look against the gathering chill of evening fall?

Some pics from a photo walk

Despite the cold the light was pretty good the other weekend, so I took myself off for one of my “photo walks” in the afternoon and early evening, several hours wandering around, mostly in parts of town I’m not in too often, and taking pics as I go. You never know what you may find – down by the Stockbridge area, outside a barber’s shop, I spotted this amazing bench, made out of old skateboards – art you can use!

While this vintage clothing store and pop-up shop had a nice, slightly surreal (almost Monty Pythonesque) touch with this giant foot outside their door:

Dusk was falling as I started walking back upwards towards the heart of the New Town, passing Cafe Rouge, one of several French cafes and restaurants in the city. The outdoor seats were now all deserted, the temperature falling as night started to settle on a winter’s afternoon, and in contrast the warmth inside against the cold outside had left the windows covered in condensation:

Then I passed this small bar/bistro, and I simply couldn’t resist getting a shot of their neon sign at night:

Just around the corner from Liquor I finally took a picture of an old business on Queen Street I have meant to shoot for years, mostly because the lines of odd statues above it always catch my eye, but I so rarely go past it I forget about it. Since I was walking past and I had the tripod I thought I may as well finally get a shot of it

Then a few moments further up, next to the recently revamped old Assembly Rooms in George Street the lane running between it and the buildings next to it looked rather good at night and seemed to be begging for a black and white shot, so I had to take one (as ever for larger versions click on the pics to see on the Woolamaloo Flickr):

Castle and spire

Another shot from recent night-time round of photo-taking – I was actually taking something else, then noticed if I moved the tripod round a little, perhaps I could fit in the both the spire of Saint Cuthberts and the western flank of Edinburgh Castle. So I had a go and it seemed to work…

Food, this way…

Doing some more night shots recently, was drawn to this buzzing neon sign (surely one of the icons of night-time, big city living), zoomed in on it. And then for some reason felt moved to switch to black and white mode and shoot it in monochrome, even though, like most neon signs, it was a vibrantly coloured piece. But I had a feeling it would look cooler in black and white in a night shot, and actually, I think it does:

Yuletide Edinburgh

It’s Edinburgh, it’s a few days before Christmas, and with the short days, long nights and the sun have set before 4 in the afternoon it’s the time of year to enjoy Edinburgh’s nocturnal aspect, and how lovely Edinburgh is in the long, dark, winter nights – here’s the view from North Bridge, which connects Old and New Towns, spanning the valley between them, with the massive Waverley railway station way below (you can see the station’s glowing glass roof on the lower right of this pic; on the far left the Fruitmarket Gallery right above the tracks on the edge of the station, City Art Centre across from it, up towards the centre the domed Bank of Scotland building and behind it Edinburgh Castle standing sentinel above its city. Down on the right, centre the neo-Classical National Gallery of Scotland – as always click to see the larger versions on my Flickr site):

And a close up on Edinburgh Castle at night – if you look at the larger version you can even see people standing on the battlements looking down into the city. This was about twenty minutes after the sun had set, and the western skies were splashed with magnificent reds and purples silhouetting the floodlit Castle for just a few, brief, magical moments, before the skies darken for the long night:

And one more of the Castle, this time taken from down in Princes Street Gardens, which gave me the angle to get Ramsay Gardens (the very expensive apartments right next to the Castle on the left) and the big Christmas tree on the Mound into the shot):

The annual festive fair and market is in the Gardens and the Mound at this time of year. Right by the towering Gothic rocket of the Scott Monument is a huge fairground ride for Christmas, basically like an old chair-o-plane ride on steroids, the difference being when this starts to spin around swinging out the hanging seats below the canopy it goes high – very high. Take a look here – the Monument is over 60 metres in height and you can see the ride goes up only a few metres short of our great literary monument, couldn’t resist trying to get an angle to fit in both, glad dad gave me a small gizmo to mount on top of the tripod, little ball-socket thing that you can loosen and tilt to easily through a variety of angles, very, very handy):

Looking along the lower part of the Gardens towards the flank of the National Galleries of Scotland – the part you can see here, the large, brightly lit plate glass windows are actually underground for the most part. The main building sit on top of the mound, but it extends underneath the plaza in front of the building, including this side which is exposed by the valley of the Gardens, and here there is a cafe, restaurant, meeting rooms and more, plus a connection to the nearby Royal Scottish Academy, which you can see the edge of above and to the right:

And here’s a view of Princes Street Gardens with the festive fair and Christmas market, taken from the steps leading down the Mound:

I love this old double-decker carousel (or gallopers, if you prefer the nice, old terms for such rides), gorgeous looking, ornately decorated piece of work:

Over in Saint Andrew Square there are more market stalls, a circular ice rink in the centre, with a round temporary bar in the middle of the rink, and also this splendid old Spiegeltent theatre:

Here’s a view of the circular ice rink from the small footbridge they added over it:

And there’s an ice rink – a more traditionally shaped one – in the Gardens right by the Scott Monument too:

And of course as well as food and drink stalls there are many selling items of all sorts from clothes to jewelry to, of course, Christmas decorations:

All combines to fairly brighten up the long, cold, dark winter nights.

Little Green Van

Walking along the promenade at Portobello, Edinburgh’s seafront, just after sunset, the owner of the Little Green Van was closing up his food and drink stall for the day. I didn’t have the tripod with me as I thought we’d be home before dark, so improvised, sat the camera on the seawall, set the timer on a long exposure and was pretty pleased with the results – not bad considering it was an improvised night shot

The blood red fortress of the night

Crossing North Bridge (which spans the deep valley between Edinburgh’s Old Town and the Georgian-era New Town) a few nights ago I noticed that the Castle was illuminated in this deep red shade – as it turned out it was to mark the annual Poppy Appeal leading up to Armistice Day and Remembrance Sunday, although given it was the week leading to Halloween the colour scheme worked quite well for that too… I was going from work to my book group, so didn’t have the tripod with me, so improvised, setting up a long exposure on the camera, setting the timer then sitting the camera on the parapet of the bridge. Not ideal – it is angled and with double decker buses rumbling over it frequently it vibrates, not what you want when trying to take a long exposure night shot, took three or four but only this one came out reasonably (click to see larger versions on my Flickr):

Edinburgh – ‘blue hour’

It’s dark well before I leave for work at this time of year, but while some complain about the increasingly long, dark nights I see it as a chance to enjoy the city’s nocturnal face, and to take some more night shots. I was lucky enough to be walking home from work at just the right time this week to capture a ‘blue hour’ shot – a phrase used by some photographers to refer to catching an early night shot, when most of the sky has gone dark but there is still just a tiny glimmer of pale, blue light in the western horizon. Walking up the Royal Mile which runs east to west and slopes upwards along the spine of the volcanic ridge the Old Town sits on, the sky above and behind me was already dark, but just a little light still to the west, and of course on a long exposure on the camera is seems much brighter as it spent a couple of minutes drinking in the scant light. I love capturing these moments even mroe than a full night shot, you get the illuminated street scenes of a busy night-time city but also that little blue light to silhouette some of the buildings too. This image must have been shared somewhere, because my views for it went crazy on my Flickr stream – over 2600 views in less than 20 hours of posting, which is pretty satisfying. Click the pic to see the larger versions on my Flickr:

Nocturnal pub

Go off the main road in the West End and you find more interesting spots, such as three pubs right by each other down a nice, old cobbled road, including this one, Teuchters:

Good real ale pub, comfortable, a little pricey perhaps, but not by the normal West End standards to be honest, and a nice place to relax (also dog friendly), although it can get very, very busy. How cosy does it look at night though?

I had actually been shooting some other parts of town at night, walking home past the pub with tripod still over shoulder, so thought may as well take a few more. I’ve grown fond of doing some city night scenes in black and white in recent years, amazing the difference it makes to switch to monochrome rather than colour. I tried focusing in on a window, giving a glimpse from cold, dark nocturnal street outside into the cosy, warm, well-lit glow within the pub, didn’t expect it to work, but seemed to come out okay:

Edinburgh moonrise

Moonrise over Edinburgh – spotted on walk home from work, sun almost vanished in the west, glanced over shoulder to see moon rising in a pale eastern sky. I stood to one side on the Royal Mile, right by the Mercat Cross. Stand a few feet to the left or right and this scene wouldn’t exist, but stand in just the right spot and there is is, an early spring moon rising right above the royal unicorn and saltire atop the Mercat Cross. Most folks walked past on their way home from work without even noticing. For those of us who do know to look for these things though, sometimes, just sometimes in the mundane, workaday world, you can find a moment of magic…

Nocturnal street mirror

I wandered around in the cold taking a bunch of night shots recently – street scenes, historic buildings of Edinburgh at night and the like, but sometimes you just find the most everyday things and they look different at night. Especially if you zoom in on them and decide to shoot in black and white. And so After shooting some buildings I turned around in a cobbled back street, saw a puddle, the dirty water no looking jet black and perfectly reflecting the world above, like a black mirror, lying in a depression in the cobbles. So on the spur of the moment I moved the tripod round and framed a shot of it:

Turned out to be very popular on Flickr – funny how something so mundane can become an interesting photo subject just because it was now night and it was shot in black and white. By day a dirty puddle of rain water in a dip in the cobbled lane, but by night it is now a Noir puddle, the sort of puddle Raymond Chandler might call upon if he needed one in a scene…

Lanterns of the Terracotta Warriors

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For only a few days starting this week to mark Chinese New Year, there’s a wonderful art installation by Xia Nan. Originally created for the Bejing Olympics and now touring the world, they are inspired by the famous Terracotta Warriors but here they are done like Chinese paper lanterns.

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The artist decided that the original Terracotta Warriors were a bit lonely, so for these paper lantern sculptures he also gave them some wives and kids to go along with them – including a pregnant wife as you can see in this one above. A trio at the back must have been more important than the others, they had their own raised platform above the others, and with the lights they cast these huge shadows over the old stonework:

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The exhibition is in the quadrangle of the historic Old College building of Edinburgh University each evening for just a week or so (handily right across the road from my work, just strolled right over after finishing up). Beautiful location and what a magical sight to see on those long, cold, dark winter nights, glowing in the darkness. I noticed the other day that I’d had a huge spike in views on Flickr, with two photos I’d taken of this exhibition especially going bananas. In fact the one below had just under 3000 views in a single 24 hour period, turned out it had been put into a gallery on Flickr of photos celebrating Chinese New Year, resulting in a huge number of views in a brief period, which was quite rewarding (click on the pics to see the larger versions on my Flickr):

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