Happy birthday, Edgar Allan Poe

Happy birthday to a writer who has been one of my favourite authors since I was a boy – happy 200th birthday, Edgar Allan Poe, born January 19th 1809 and died October 7th 1849. Or perhaps he didn’t die but was simply bricked up alive in a catacomb… Dead for a century and half and still influencing other writers, comics artists, movie makers, not to mention setting out the basic template for the modern detective several decades before Sir Arthur Conan Doyle created Holmes.

In fact it seems to be quite a year for anniversaries on the literary calendar – there’s Poe, of course, its 200 years since Charles Darwin was born too, 150 years since On the Origin of Species was published and 150 years since Sir Arthur Conan Doyle was born. Conan Doyle’s delightful adventure yarn of explorers and dinosaurs, The Lost World, is the central plank of this year’s One Book, One Edinburgh campaign in February (Doyle being a local lad – in fact he would have studied not far from where I work), following on from the last two years where Cam Kennedy and Alan Grant created graphic novel adaptations of Stevenson. There will be events, free books, school events and other happenings.

This time it will also extend to Glasgow and ties in with the Darwin 200 events across the UK, including a graphic nove biography of Darwin by Simon Gurr and Eugene Byrne, all of which I hope helps gets younger readers excited and reading and maybe the Lost World will give them an interest in dinosaurs then natural history (so they know to tell ‘intelligent design’ eejits to feck off when they encounter those brain-damaged idiots). It certainly did for me a kid, leading me to look for factual books on dinosaurs, then geology, evolution, which tied in with interests in astronomy and space exploration, being able to apply that learning to other bodies and… Well, that’s kind of the point, once you start a chain of reading like that it sparks off more and more ideas and questions, leading to more reading and a continually growing link of reading and learning that goes with you through life. All from a good adventure yarn and some dinosaurs.

4 thoughts on “Happy birthday, Edgar Allan Poe

  1. I've only read one story by Poe, that being 'The Murders in the Rue Morgue' last year, and I have to say I was blown away by how complete it was. Everything that we expect to find in the modern crime story was there. Locked room mystery? Check. Mercurial, anti-social but brilliant detective? Check. Forensic analysis? Check. Grotesque, bizarre, seemingly motiveless murder? Check. And so on. If you could somehow erase this one story and its influence from literary history, I suppose 90 per cent of crime fiction simply wouldn't exist, including all of Sherlock Holmes. Quite brilliant.

  2. I've only read one story by Poe, that being 'The Murders in the Rue Morgue' last year, and I have to say I was blown away by how complete it was. Everything that we expect to find in the modern crime story was there. Locked room mystery? Check. Mercurial, anti-social but brilliant detective? Check. Forensic analysis? Check. Grotesque, bizarre, seemingly motiveless murder? Check. And so on. If you could somehow erase this one story and its influence from literary history, I suppose 90 per cent of crime fiction simply wouldn't exist, including all of Sherlock Holmes. Quite brilliant.

  3. I've only read one story by Poe, that being 'The Murders in the Rue Morgue' last year, and I have to say I was blown away by how complete it was. Everything that we expect to find in the modern crime story was there. Locked room mystery? Check. Mercurial, anti-social but brilliant detective? Check. Forensic analysis? Check. Grotesque, bizarre, seemingly motiveless murder? Check. And so on. If you could somehow erase this one story and its influence from literary history, I suppose 90 per cent of crime fiction simply wouldn't exist, including all of Sherlock Holmes. Quite brilliant.

  4. I've only read one story by Poe, that being 'The Murders in the Rue Morgue' last year, and I have to say I was blown away by how complete it was. Everything that we expect to find in the modern crime story was there. Locked room mystery? Check. Mercurial, anti-social but brilliant detective? Check. Forensic analysis? Check. Grotesque, bizarre, seemingly motiveless murder? Check. And so on. If you could somehow erase this one story and its influence from literary history, I suppose 90 per cent of crime fiction simply wouldn't exist, including all of Sherlock Holmes. Quite brilliant.

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