Launch portal

The subway that runs under the road connecting the Potterrow student union to the back of the Old College and the National Museum of Scotland has often caught my eye because of its shape and the perspective it creates. Walking past it at night, though, it made me think of something from an old sci-fi movie – the concrete underpass where the Droogs beat up a man in Clockwork Orange, perhaps.

Portal from Light to Dark

Or, on a lighter note than that, it reminds my geek brain of the fighter launch tubes from the 1970s Buck Rogers, or Battlestar Galactica (albeit a much more monochromatic one!).

Tollcross by night

Tollcross at Night 05

Walking home the other evening, taking some night shots as I did, this batch were around Tollcross, like the lovely old Cameo Cinema (seen above), with people waiting at the bus stop in front of it, standing under the marquee, or this cafe and neighbouring shop, still busy with people (had to take quick shot between the traffic flowing by this busy area):

Tollcross at Night 02

And here’s the distinctive red sandstone facade of the King’s Theatre at night, the green building on the lower right of the theatre is Bennett’s Bar, one of my favourite watering holes for many years (good real ales, has cool old tables decorated with OS maps, and it’s dog-friendly):

Tollcross at Night 07

Time for launch

Down on a pretty overcast, cloudy Portobello this afternoon, and saw the handsome wooden skiff Jenny Skylark being prepped for launch:

Time to Launch 01

Time to Launch 02

And there she goes, slipping into the waters:

Time to Launch 04

Time to Launch 06

Time to Launch 07

And off she goes, rowing out into a pretty misty Firth of Forth (you can just see one of the larger islands vaguely through the haar in the background):

Time to Launch 09

Time to Launch 010

As they rowed further out I took one more shot – the sea and the mist were blending into one another so much that they started to look the same, as if the boat were rowing out into a blank, white dimension…

Time to Launch 011

Meanwhile I found some of their compatriots pulling their skiff along the Promenade on wheels to get it ready for launch (either that or this is some bizarre new boat-car hybrid):

Boat Car

And on a non-related note, I spotted this bizarre sculpture on the beach – quite creepy looking thing, isn’t it? Blair Witch Beach Project, anyone??

Blair Witch Beach

Moonrise

Gorgeously bright winter moonrise this evening. I was coming home from an afternoon walk so didn’t have the tripod, but had to try with the low light mode for a freehand shot. The result isn’t as sharp as with a proper long exposure on the tripod, but I had to try and grab this glorious, deep blue dusk sky and the Moon rising, just as it was about to go behind the tower of Saint John’s Church on Princes Street:

Moonrise and Tower 01

And a quick, rough freehand close-up:

Moonrise and Tower 02

Three Wise Men?

Down at Portobello with friend and his hounds for a stroll on a windy but sunny (and very mild for February) afternoon. On the way back to the car we noticed these three chaps in white robes, carrying staffs – we had seen a similar sight a year or two ago around this spot on the beach, although last time it was a larger group of men and women, all similarly attired.

Three Wise Men and the Sea 01

As with the previous time we’d seen this, they walked down towards the shoreline, then stood facing out to sea, singing to the waters beyond. I have no idea what the ceremony was about, I’m presuming it is religious. When I posted some photos of the previous group I had witnessed on my Flickr a couple of years back a friend on there commented he didn’t know what the purpose was exactly, but he had seen this ceremony carried out when he was on the coast of western Africa.

Three Wise Men and the Sea 02

Whatever it was, it was certainly different from the normal groups of joggers and do-walkers! Another good reason to always have the trusty camera with me in my satchel…

Three Wise Men and the Sea 03

Three Wise Men and the Sea 04

Night-time at the Museum

Normally I like visiting the main hall of the original part of the National Museum of Scotland during the day, as the Victorian glass and steel roof means this large space is flooded with natural light, even on an overcast, cloudy day (several galleries along the railings are well served by this light, especially a row of sculptures). Still, it has a certain charm after nightfall too:

National Museum of Scotland at Night 01

I was zooming in on this handsome old wrought-iron drinking fountain with its elaborate surround. I had the camera on a tripod and used a (fairly short!) long exposure, the result was this very clear image of the fountain while the visitors around it were all motion blurred ghosts. It wasn’t a deliberate plan but I quite like the sort of quality it brought to this pic:

National Museum of Scotland at Night 02

Looking straight cross the main hall to the stairs ascending and descending at the opposite end:

National Museum of Scotland at Night 04

Meanwhile, a little earlier I had been on the roof terrace of the modern part of the museum, a free to visit spot that many seem to miss, but which offers splendid views out across Edinburgh’s Old Town in all directions, including eastwards to Athur’s Seat, the huge extinct volcano which sits in the Royal Park of Holyrood (by the palace) and gives us a chance for a country hill walk without leaving the town. Here is Arthur’s Seat and Salisbury Crags catching the final half hour of golden light on a winter’s afternoon:

Blessed by the last light of an autumn day 01

Flocks of birds swooping around in tight formation over the rooftops of the Old Town as dusk falls on the short winter day:

Blessed by the last light of an autumn day 03

Spires and minarets of Heriot’s School silhoutted by the setting winter sun:

Blessed by the last light of an autumn day 05

Looking north from the roof terrace across the Old Town:

Blessed by the last light of an autumn day 06

And of course you get a terrific view of the Castle:

Blessed by the last light of an autumn day 07

And Outlook Tower, part of the Camera Obscura, which has been a visitor attraction in the city since the 19th century and still draws them in, sitting right in front of the entrance to the Castle Esplanade, again catching the last few minutes of winter daylight:

Blessed by the last light of an autumn day 08

And this one was an impulse shot – the east side of the roof terrace has a white wall, with a large section cut out. As the sun was rapidly reclining in the west it cast a gorgeous golden light, throwing shadows onto the white wall and that lovely, warm colour. Along with the cut-put viewing space in the wall acting like a picture frame with the dome of Old College (a distinctive landmark on the Old Town’s skyline) I thought I’d try a pic, quite pleased with how it came out, given it was a spur of the moment thing when I noticed how the light was hitting the wall:

Sunset framed and shadowed

Moonrise Kingdom

Watched the Moon rising over McEwan Hall the other evening, from the roof terrace of the National Museum of Scotland (one of the best spots for looking out over the roofs, spires and domes of Edinburgh – and like the museum it’s free):

Winter Moonrise 01

And while I had that elevated vantage point and dusk was falling, I thought I would try to zoom in a bit and see if I could get a Moon shot too:

Winter Moonrise 02

Then as night fell properly I went for a stroll with camera and tripod, over to Bristo Square and Edinburgh University to take a pic of the Teviot, which is the oldest purpose-built student union in the world (and resembles what Hogwart’s student union would look like if they served booze). Used to enjoy the regular CeilidhPartyDisco nights there when I was an undergrad (live band Ceilidh for first half of night, then late night disco, we had fun), still a hugely popular venue:

Bristo Square at night 02

And then the recently refurbished and enhanced McEwan Hall at night – this is just half an hour or so after the shot at the top of the dome with the Moon rising above it, already full darkness fallen. This is where my graduation ceremony took place, we all stood in this square afterwards taking photos with our families, feels like a lifetime ago now:

Bristo Square at night 04

“I was always a mad comet…”

I was always a mad comet, a dark star...”

Phillip Hoare’s short film about the poet Wilfred Owen has a sad beauty to it:

Owen died on this day, one hundred years ago, killed just days before the 1918 Armistice would silence the guns of the Great War, into whose dark maw so many legions marched, never to return. I think of Owen often at this time of year, not just for his powerful poetry from the trenches, but because of his local connection to me. Recuperating from Shell Shock he was sent to Craiglockhart, just a short walk from my flat in Edinburgh (enlisted men were rarely so fortunate, they were told they were “cowards” if they showed Shell Shock, or if treated were given brutal regimes like ECT. Not so the officers, of course).

It was there Owen was encouraged by a pioneering doctor to use his dreams and nightmares from the trenches in his writing, and meets fellow poet Siegfried Sassoon, both of these changing his writing style, increasing the power he pours into his verse. While recuperating there he would sometimes guest as a literature teacher at the school around the corner from my home; he probably strolled right past my street. Edinburgh is like that, it has as many layers of literary history and connections as it has complex volcanic geology. Here the road Sassoon and Owen walked on their way into town, arm in arm, discussing poetry. There where Stevenson ducked out of university classes in his velvet coat, to head to the pub around the corner from my old work. There where Conan Doyle met Bell, who would become his model for Holmes, here, behind rows of tenements and houses, the school where Muriel Spark studied, where a teacher would become part of her notion for Miss Brodie. Here’s where Robert Burns stayed, there is the grave of his beloved Clarinda, in the same kirkyard as his poetic muse, Fergusson.

Edinburgh it still like that – there’s the literary salon, the regular book clubs, the book festival, there are the cafes Rowling wrote the first Harry Potter book in because it was cheaper than trying to heat her home when she had no money, there’s the pub where the fictional Inspector Rebus drinks, and his creator, Ian Rankin too. As a lifelong reader and as a bookseller it’s one of the aspects of Edinburgh that makes me love living here; the written word here is written into the cityscape…

Just Scots Going Around Their Business

Saint John’s Church on Princes Street has been painting large murals commenting on social and moral problems for many years. It’s been a little while since I saw a new one, but noticed today a fresh one had been painted, celebrating the diversity of multi-cultural Scottish society and timed to coincide with Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year – in an especially nice touch the figure on the upper right pays homage to Raeburn’s 18th century painting of the Reverend Robert Walker ice-skating on Duddingston Loch in Edinburgh, now famous as the symbol of the National Galleries of Scotland:

Just Scots Going Around Their Business

Fringe time

It’s August and that means festival time in Edinburgh, with several enormous festivals running at the same time, plus the usual horde of tourists, it can make it a frustrating experience for locals trying to get around their town. But it also makes for happy hunting grounds for photographs, especially the Fringe on the Royal Mile, where a section is put aside in August for performers to tout their shows, even including wee stages where some enact excerpts from their acts to try and interest audiences to come to their shows (and with such a vast array of shows every day and night they really need to work to get an audience)

Fringe on the Mile 2018 01 Fringe on the Mile 2018 021 Fringe on the Mile 2018 024 Saucy Jack and the Space Vixens have been a regular popular show on the Fringe, nice to see them back again! Fringe on the Mile 2018 030 Fringe on the Mile 2018 036 The pic above was selected for Flick’r Explore front page, which takes photos from all around the globe uploaded to Flickr each day. I was quite chuffed with how this pic came out considering it was a very quick street portrait, and it was nice to see it being put on the Flickr front page and getting several thousand views in a few hours as a result. Fringe on the Mile 2018 044 Finding the manual zoom and focus on the big Fuji bridge camera to be very handy for getting in a bit closer for street portraits without having to shove the camera right in their faces. Fringe on the Mile 2018 042 Fringe on the Mile 2018 076 Fringe on the Mile 2018 054 Fringe on the Mile 2018 072 Fringe on the Mile 2018 078 Fringe on the Mile 2018 080 Fringe on the Mile 2018 083 Fringe on the Mile 2018 087 Fringe on the Mile 2018 091 Fringe on the Mile 2018 095 Fringe on the Mile 2018 0103 Fringe on the Mile 2018 0104 Fringe on the Mile 2018 0105 Fringe on the Mile 2018 0114 Fringe on the Mile 2018 0120 Fringe on the Mile 2018 0121 Fringe on the Mile 2018 0122 Fringe on the Mile 2018 0126 The Girls From Oz were singing some of their show on the Mile. I normally prefer monochrome for people watching shots (somehow just works better), but they were so resplendent in their vibrantly blue Aussie flag dresses I had to shoot some colour pics too! Fringe on the Mile 2018 0124 Fringe on the Mile 2018 0127